Subway Savant

Jan 21 2014
ex-genius:

HEY NEW YORKERS
Your dear friends at the MTA have given you a totally legit excuse to duck out early today, if you weren’t already going to. You are welcome. 

ex-genius:

HEY NEW YORKERS

Your dear friends at the MTA have given you a totally legit excuse to duck out early today, if you weren’t already going to. You are welcome. 

32 notes

Nov 21 2013

On October 24, 2013, the NYC Subway system carried a record 5,985,311 passengers.

This is about 50,000 more than the previous record, set on a different Thursday last october. 

It also is the equivalent of 71% of the entire city taking a ride on the subway. Or more than a week of riders for the second busiest subway in the country, the Washington DC Metro. 

New York Times

13 notes

Oct 31 2013

austra:

The New York Subway Signs Experiment (by Yosef Lerner)

<3333333333

Well - they point at the board to prove they checked to make sure all the doors are platformed before opening the doors - but still. This video is great. 

9 notes

Jul 16 2013

transitmaps:

Historical Map: New York Metropolitan Transit Authority 1968 Plan for Rail Improvement and Transit Expansion

(Source: hyperrealcartography)

These maps are wonderfully designed. 

While it’s easy to be disheartened that many of these grand plans for expansion have been indefinitely shelved - I think it’s worth reflecting on the elements of these proposals which now are realities, and those that are under construction

  • The 63rd street tunnel, now carrying the F train, is proposed here with connections to Broadway and 6th Ave, and that’s now a thing that exists. 
  • The Archer Ave subway is proposed on this map, and some of that was built, now carrying the E between Jamaica-Van Wyck and Jamaica Center. 
  • The AirTrain, a light-rail link between the LIRR, NYCT and JFK airport sort of counts to satisfy the LIRR connection to JFK airport proposed here. 

Included on this map and now under construction: 

  • Phase one of the Second Avenue subway Comprising slightly less than what phase one is proposed here on ye map. 
  • East Side Access, the LIRR connection to Grand Central terminal is shown here, and currently under construction. 

Also, we have the bonus of the 7 line extension to 34th st 10th ave, which is not proposed back then at all, (honestly, there was no need for it then. 

So sure, there have been many expansive visions for transit in NY City which have remained unrealized - but the picture is not one of stagnation. As a matter of fact, the engineering being done, aesthetically speaking, is a thing of beauty.

181 notes

Jun 24 2013
The 7 Line extension seems to be coming along nicely - and if you haven&#8217;t yet noticed, the MTA&#8217;s underground construction photos are fantastic. 

The 7 Line extension seems to be coming along nicely - and if you haven’t yet noticed, the MTA’s underground construction photos are fantastic. 

34 notes

Jun 13 2013
improvesubway:

56. Safe Inter-Car Passage

An idea taken from articulated buses, a safe intercar passage, with an actual floor and walls would help solve the problem of people falling off the train or through the passage in between trains.
Many thanks to  Reddit user dspeyer for their opinion on this subject.


This is an interesting idea - the concept is called &#8220;Open Gangways&#8221;, and actually can be seen on a few systems, most notably in the Toronto Subway on a train called the &#8220;Toronto Rocket&#8221;
There is debate whether it would be feasible for NYC&#8217;s system, which has some of the tightest curves in the world and is among the oldest subways in existence. 
That said, the idea was specifically suggested to manufacturers in the MTA&#8217;s solicitation of proposals for new subway cars. The cars, whether they feature open gangways or not, will replace the aging trains that currently make up the A and R lines, and sometimes an unhappy F train. 

improvesubway:

56. Safe Inter-Car Passage

An idea taken from articulated buses, a safe intercar passage, with an actual floor and walls would help solve the problem of people falling off the train or through the passage in between trains.

Many thanks to  Reddit user dspeyer for their opinion on this subject.

This is an interesting idea - the concept is called “Open Gangways”, and actually can be seen on a few systems, most notably in the Toronto Subway on a train called the “Toronto Rocket”

There is debate whether it would be feasible for NYC’s system, which has some of the tightest curves in the world and is among the oldest subways in existence. 

That said, the idea was specifically suggested to manufacturers in the MTA’s solicitation of proposals for new subway cars. The cars, whether they feature open gangways or not, will replace the aging trains that currently make up the A and R lines, and sometimes an unhappy F train. 

21 notes

Jun 05 2013

The Montague St. Tube, which carries the R train between Manhattan and Queens, will be closed for 14 Months starting this August. The closure is to repair damage still present from the Hurricane. 

The G train is also getting what-for, with shuttle buses replacing the train’s 3 northernmost stops for 12 consecutive weekends starting in july. 

R Train Advisory | G Train Advisory

5 notes

May 31 2013
nytransitmuseum:


Inspired by the engineering, intricate choreography, and impromptu interactions of your daily commute?  Looking for a public platform to present your ideas to a captive audience? Wish there was an open mic night for historians and urbanists? A show-and-tell for your creative musings on transit?  
Us, too.  That’s why we are excited to announce Platform, a new series of cross-disciplinary programs created by the public for the public. Have an idea? We’ll give you a platform.
The Museum is now accepting program proposals for early Fall. We welcome submissions from all disciplines—history, science, engineering, visual and performing arts, urban studies, city planning, academic fields. The common denominator? Public transportation.
Submissions may include but are not limited to the following:
Live performance (music, theater, dance, spoken word, storytelling, comedy)
Film (documentary, fiction, creative media works)
Visual Art (must be presentation or other programmatic discussion of artwork)
Presentation (academic lecture, informal slideshow, etc) 
Panel discussion (propose participants, moderator, topic, your expertise)
Other participatory events
Submissions will be reviewed by the Museum. To be considered in the first round, please submit a complete proposal by Friday, August 9 at noon. 
Have a question? Need some help refining your idea? Ready to submit a complete proposal? Contact us at programs@transitmuseumeducation.org 
Program proposals should include all of the following:
Title of Program
Keywords (3 max) that describe your program
Brief  description (2 sentence max) of your program
Long form description including details about content, presentation or performance method, participants, estimated length, target audience, and technical requirements
Examples, as relevant (could include prior presentation of program, promotional materials, links, videos, photos, description of proposed participants, etc.)
Brief bio (3 sentence max) of yourself
Submission Deadline: Friday, August 9 by noon.

The deadline is in a little more than 2 months, so I expect to see awesome proposals from all of you. 

nytransitmuseum:

Inspired by the engineering, intricate choreography, and impromptu interactions of your daily commute?  Looking for a public platform to present your ideas to a captive audience? Wish there was an open mic night for historians and urbanists? A show-and-tell for your creative musings on transit? 

Us, too.  That’s why we are excited to announce Platform, a new series of cross-disciplinary programs created by the public for the public. Have an idea? We’ll give you a platform.

The Museum is now accepting program proposals for early Fall. We welcome submissions from all disciplines—history, science, engineering, visual and performing arts, urban studies, city planning, academic fields. The common denominator? Public transportation.

Submissions may include but are not limited to the following:

  • Live performance (music, theater, dance, spoken word, storytelling, comedy)
  • Film (documentary, fiction, creative media works)
  • Visual Art (must be presentation or other programmatic discussion of artwork)
  • Presentation (academic lecture, informal slideshow, etc)
  • Panel discussion (propose participants, moderator, topic, your expertise)
  • Other participatory events

Submissions will be reviewed by the Museum. To be considered in the first round, please submit a complete proposal by Friday, August 9 at noon. 

Have a question? Need some help refining your idea? Ready to submit a complete proposal? Contact us at programs@transitmuseumeducation.org 

Program proposals should include all of the following:

  • Title of Program
  • Keywords (3 max) that describe your program
  • Brief  description (2 sentence max) of your program
  • Long form description including details about content, presentation or performance method, participants, estimated length, target audience, and technical requirements
  • Examples, as relevant (could include prior presentation of program, promotional materials, links, videos, photos, description of proposed participants, etc.)
  • Brief bio (3 sentence max) of yourself

Submission Deadline: Friday, August 9 by noon.

The deadline is in a little more than 2 months, so I expect to see awesome proposals from all of you. 

17 notes

May 30 2013

Today the (A) train returned to the Rockaways after several months of absence in the wake of Sandy. 

To mark the occasion, as the top photo shows, the MTA ran a vintage train of 1930’s R1/9 Subway cars. Adorned on the front was a banner that said “Rockaway Here We Come!” 

What you may not know is that this very same message appeared on the very first subway to visit the Rockaway peninsula when the line was opened in 1956, as shown in the bottom photo. 

97 notes

+
Welcome Back
For the first time since Hurricane Sandy, the Subway Map is back to normal. 
There&#8217;s still damage to repair, but each and every station served before the storm is once again being served. 

Welcome Back


For the first time since Hurricane Sandy, the Subway Map is back to normal. 

There’s still damage to repair, but each and every station served before the storm is once again being served. 

17 notes

Apr 26 2013

ex-genius:

So 30 more subway stations in NYC got fitted with cell phone service today, which is pretty great - but AT&T, you should be pretty embarrassed that Internet service is now way, way better below ground than it is at street level.

In case you missed it, a whole bunch of the west side now has underground cell service.

25 notes

Apr 03 2013
The South Ferry Loop reopens tomorrow, and along with it return these familiar signs to the 1 train.

See, the first subway lines in manhattan, what are today the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 trains were all built with loop terminals at their southern ends. The platform was built around a sharp curve, allowing the train to reverse direction without hassle.

But the loop platforms were a hassle, as they created large gaps between the platform and the doors. The city hall loop was closed first, there was already a station nearby. The inner track of the south ferry loop was used for a shuttle service to Bowling Green for a while, but this was later eliminated. The last loop to see service, the south ferry outer loop, closed in 2009. It was replaced with a brand new two track stub terminal built beneath the existing station.

Said terminal was under about 20 feet of water during hurricane Sandy. The MTA estimates 2-3 years to repair, so in the meantime, they’ll re-open the South Ferry outer loop to passengers tomorrow morning at 5 am.

The station uses motorized platforms, or “gap fillers” for every door of the train, and only platforms the firs 5 cars. You should check it out at some point: the next time it closes, I doubt it will reopen.

The South Ferry Loop reopens tomorrow, and along with it return these familiar signs to the 1 train.

See, the first subway lines in manhattan, what are today the 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 trains were all built with loop terminals at their southern ends. The platform was built around a sharp curve, allowing the train to reverse direction without hassle.

But the loop platforms were a hassle, as they created large gaps between the platform and the doors. The city hall loop was closed first, there was already a station nearby. The inner track of the south ferry loop was used for a shuttle service to Bowling Green for a while, but this was later eliminated. The last loop to see service, the south ferry outer loop, closed in 2009. It was replaced with a brand new two track stub terminal built beneath the existing station.

Said terminal was under about 20 feet of water during hurricane Sandy. The MTA estimates 2-3 years to repair, so in the meantime, they’ll re-open the South Ferry outer loop to passengers tomorrow morning at 5 am.

The station uses motorized platforms, or “gap fillers” for every door of the train, and only platforms the firs 5 cars. You should check it out at some point: the next time it closes, I doubt it will reopen.

5 notes

Mar 26 2013
Mar 25 2013

petervidani:

York Street → East Broadway

Uncommon view of the Rutgers St Tube from up front. 

There’s only 1 type of subway car left that gives passengers this view, they’re about to be 50 years old, and they’ll be all gone before the end of the decade. 

48 notes

Mar 05 2013
"Uh, is this the Express?"
(alternate caption: This is a Manhattan-bound Cement Truck. The next stop is Vernon-Jackson Blvds. Stand clear of the closing doors)
But yes - this is a photo of a cement truck making a stop at Hunterspoint Ave on the 7 line. 
It&#8217;s from the MTA flickr, where it bears the caption &#8220;This is the first time we have used a crane to lower a cement truck onto tracks and into a tunnel.&#8221;
Part of me hopes this becomes a trend, mostly because I&#8217;d love to see the looks on peoples faces if something like this trundled through an In-service station. 

"Uh, is this the Express?"

(alternate caption: This is a Manhattan-bound Cement Truck. The next stop is Vernon-Jackson Blvds. Stand clear of the closing doors)

But yes - this is a photo of a cement truck making a stop at Hunterspoint Ave on the 7 line. 

It’s from the MTA flickr, where it bears the caption “This is the first time we have used a crane to lower a cement truck onto tracks and into a tunnel.”

Part of me hopes this becomes a trend, mostly because I’d love to see the looks on peoples faces if something like this trundled through an In-service station. 

55 notes

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